Jobs: Ichthyology

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Research Scientist in Marine Genetics and Genomics

Date Posted: 7 Jun 2017 (Show details)

Institution: University of Washington JISAO
Location: Seattle, Washington
Closing date: This position is open until filled.

The Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean (JISAO) at the University of Washington is seeking a research scientist in molecular genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics of marine fishes and invertebrates for new G3 (Genetics and Genomics Group) Lab at NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab (PMEL).The successful candidate will help run the new Molecular Genetics and Genomics Lab, write papers, apply for grants, help supervise personnel for marine projects along the Pacific Ocean, Bering Sea, and the Arctic.

The salary for this permanent position is $55,000+/year, depending on qualifications and experience, and the position includes excellent benefits.

Qualifications:

  • The position requires a Ph.D. and a first authored publications must be in hand.
  • Postdoctoral experience preferred.
  • Grant experience and excellent publication record preferred.
  • Field sampling and research cruise experience preferred.
  • Statistical analysis experience required. Bioinformatics experience preferred (R, QIIME, PERL, Python, etc.).
  • Next Generation Sequencing experience required. 

To Apply:

Apply online at uwhires.admin.washington.edu/eng/candidates/default.cfm?szCategory=jobprofile&szOrderID=144793&szCandidateID=0&szSearchWords=&szReturnToSearch=1.

The University of Washington is a leader in environmental stewardship & sustainability, and committed to becoming climate neutral. The University of Washington is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer.

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Ecology and Evolution

Date Posted: 3 Apr 2017 (Show details)

Institution: Murray State University
Location: Murray, Kentucky
Closing date: not provided

The Watershed Studies Institute and Department of Biological Sciences, Murray State University is seeking a postdoctoral associate. The successful applicant will conduct research on life history evolution and population/community ecology, help mentor graduate and undergraduate research students, and teach one biology course per semester. Research will focus on the impacts of size structure and climate on polyphenism and resulting trophic cascades, using mesocosm experiments and analysis of long-term data sets.

This is a two-year position starting August 1, 2017. The salary is $47,500/year with benefits.

Murray is a highly-rated, vibrant public university with significant infrastructure and personnel dedicated to ecological research, including the Hancock Biological Station.

Qualifications:

Ph.D. required and experience with experimental design is preferred.  

To Apply:

Email a letter of interest detailing research goals and experience, a curriculum vitae, several representative reprints, and email addresses of three references to Dr. Howard Whiteman (hwhiteman [at] murraystate [dot] edu).

The review of applications begins immediately, but new applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Murray State University is an equal education and employment opportunity, M/F/D, AA employer.

Ichthyology Graduate Student Opportunities

Date Posted: 5 Jun 2016 (Show details)

Institution: University of Rhode Island
Location: Kingston, Rhode Island
Closing date: not provided

The Webb Lab at the University of Rhode Island has openings for graduate students (MS or PhD) in Spring 2017 or Fall 2017. Students with experience and/or a strong interest in fish morphology and who are interested in comparative, functional, and evolutionary aspects of sensory anatomy and/or development in fishes are encouraged to visit the Webb Lab website for more information.

Projects include:

  • Sensory ontogeny in the pelagic larvae of coral reef fishes;
  • Sensory biology of deep-sea fishes (lateral line and other modalities);
  • Evolution and development of the mechanosensory lateral line system (using cichlid fishes as a model system);
  • Others, based on mutual interests and funding opportunities.

Contact: Jaqueline Webb, Jacqueline_webb [at] uri [dot] edu.  or talk with her at the JMIH meeting in July 2016.  

Ph.D Position in Population Genetics in Australian Streams

Date Posted: 9 Jul 2015 (Show details)

Institution: University of Canberra
Location: Canberra, Australia
Closing date: not provided

A Ph.D. project is available at the University of Canberra studying the drivers of fine scale genetic spatial structuring in aquatic organisms in eastern Australia with a focus on the Murray-Darling Basin, Lake Eyre Basin and Clarence River system.

Our central aim is to determine the spatial scale at which species are genetically structured in riverine ecosystems. The spatial scale of population sub-structuring provides indirect estimates of the degree of mixing between populations and the speed at which recolonization occurs in stream reaches following extirpation events, and so is a crucial component of the management of aquatic ecosystems and of restoration efforts. Despite its importance, genetic research across varying spatial scales is lacking for most aquatic species and river basins. Specifically, this project will address three questions:

  • How does genetic structure within aquatic species vary across the riverine landscape at the spatial scales of river reaches, tributaries, major rivers and drainage basins?
  • Do more complex dendritic riverine networks show greater intra-specific genetic structure than linear systems at the same scale, and if so, why?
  • How has variation in fluvial geomorphic characteristics and current and long-term climatic variation influenced connectivity and the spatial scale in structuring riverine fauna over the last ~100,000 years?

We are collecting SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) data for thousands of loci via next-generation sequencing for multiple species including fishes, turtles and shrimps from several focal catchments that have a range of dendritic structures across an aridity gradient with a variety of fluvial geomorphic characteristics and histories.

The options for the specific Ph.D. research questions are somewhat open, but projects would be expected to focus on developing and extending connectivity models that compare different network structures and incorporating and analysis our SNP datasets with these models. A strong background in modeling (knowledge in computer programming, statistical and spatial analysis using R) is important, while knowledge of genetic data, while helpful is not crucial. The Ph.D. project is part of a recently successfully granted ARC Linkage project; the detailed project description is available on request. Students would be supervised by some combination of Bernd Gruber, Peter Unmack, Duanne White or Arthur Georges and others, depending on the final project details.

Important Points

  • This project and the PhD candidature will be administered through the University of Canberra.
  • You will need to have completed a B.Sc. and some subsequent form of research-focussed degree (an M.Sc., or in the Australian/New Zealand system, an Honors year) to be considered.
  • If you are an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, you would be eligible to be considered for an APA Stipend Scholarship, and would be eligible for exemption from tuition fee payments under the Australian Government’s Research Training Scheme (RTS). An APA stipend scholarship is currently valued at $28,549pa. A small number of top-up Scholarships valued at $5,000 pa are also available;
  • If you are not an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, unless you are the recipient of a competitive merit based scholarship, you will be liable for upfront fees, at a rate of approximately $AUS 20k p.a.

To Apply:

If you are interested in applying, please send an email to Peter Unmack (peter [dot] unmack [at] canberra [dot] edu [dot] au) and provide the following information:

  • An expression of interest, and some general background of your past experience, qualifications, and expertise relevant to this project;
  • A copy of your CV;
  • Preferably, copies of all your academic transcripts (B.Sc. and subsequent degrees) to demonstrate which specific subjects you have undertaken.

Ph.D Position in Australian Freshwater Fishes

Date Posted: 9 Jul 2015 (Show details)

Institution: University of Canberra
Location: Canberra, Australia
Closing date: not provided

A PhD project is available at the University of Canberra studying the evolutionary origins of sexually-parasitic ‘unisexual’ lineages in carp gudgeons (Eleotridae: genus Hypseleotris).

Vertebrate groups that harbour both sexual and unisexual taxa have been highly prized as testing grounds for a range of big-picture questions in evolutionary biology. However, such groups are extremely rare, and none thus far has provided the optimal mix of biological features required to fully explore these questions. Our project has three general aims for newly-discovered instances of unisexuality in carp gudgeons:

  • Establish this group as a powerful vertebrate model for the study of unisexuality and of the evolutionary significance of sex;
  • Test six ‘standard’ hypotheses about the evolutionary attributes of vertebrate unisexuals'
  • Provide the essential genomic and morphological criteria required to uniquely identify each sexual and sexually-parasitic taxon in this hugely-important but neglected complex of freshwater fishes, prominent residents of Australia’s most-intensively studied waterways.

These aims will be achieved using a combination of multiple genetic technologies (allozymes, mtDNA, next-generation DNA), laboratory breeding trials, basic ecological studies, and morphological assessments.

Unisexual carp gudgeons represent the first example of sexual parasitism in any Australian vertebrate, the first new instance in a vertebrate world-wide in over 20 years, and only the fourth vertebrate example of an all-male hybridogen. As part of our broader project, we expect the successful elucidation of the number, nature, and evolutionary origins of unisexual lineages in carp gudgeons, underpinned by a solid taxonomic framework, laboratory husbandry protocols, and breeding experimentation, to trigger a considerable volume of theoretical and applied research, both in Australia and world-wide.

Carp gudgeons are among the most abundant native fishes in south eastern Australia, where they comprise ~6 sexual species (three of which are undescribed). Four of these sexual species are known to mate with (and thus help perpetuate) sexually parasitic lineages, while another “species” (Lakes carp gudgeon) is currently only known from its genetic signature in some unisexual lineages (i.e. the sexual ancestor appears to be extinct). Ecologically these fishes offer great opportunities for research, since multiple sexual and unisexual forms often occur at the same site, both in the Murray-Darling Basin and the coastal drainages along central eastern Australia. Research into the ecology and evolution of these fishes remains limited, so all new investigations will be groud-breaking.

The options for the specific Ph.D. research questions are wide open, but projects examining evolutionary questions around their reproduction in aquariums, aspects of their ecology in the wild or examining morphological variation are preferred. The Ph.D. project is part of a recently successfully granted ARC Discovery project; the detailed project description is available on request. Students would be supervised by Peter Unmack (UC), Mark Adams (SA Museum) and others, depending on the project.

Important Points:

  • This project and the PhD candidature will be administered through the University of Canberra.
  • You will need to have completed a B.Sc. and some subsequent form of research-focussed degree (an M.Sc., or in the Australian/New Zealand system, an Honors year) to be considered.
  • If you are an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, you would be eligible to be considered for an APA Stipend Scholarship, and would be eligible for exemption from tuition fee payments under the Australian Government’s Research Training Scheme (RTS). An APA stipend scholarship is currently valued at $28,549pa.  A small number of top-up Scholarships valued at $5,000 pa are also available.
  • If you are not an Australian or New Zealand citizen or Australian permanent resident, unless you are the recipient of a competitive merit based scholarship, you will be liable for upfront fees, at a rate of approximately $AUS 20k p.a.

To Apply:

If you are interested in applying, please email Peter Unmack (peter [dot] unmack [at] canberra [dot] edu [dot] au) and provide the following information:

  • An expression of interest, and some general background of your past experience, qualifications, and expertise relevant to this project
  • A copy of your CV
  • Preferably, copies of all your academic transcripts (B.Sc. and subsequent degrees) to demonstrate which specific subjects you have undertaken.
Seminatrix pygaea
Speckled Darter